New York 2140 by Kim Stanley Robinson

Filed under:Uncategorized — posted by Randolph on February 26, 2021 @ 4:58 pm

This book tells the story of several people inhabiting a skyscraper in New York City in the year 2140. Global warming has raised the ocean level to the point of flooding lower-elevation buildings in the city. Some people live below the high-tide level. Below sea level in poorer sections of town.

One plot line involves elderly man who studies old maps and two young boys. The man believes he’s discovered the location of an old shipwreck that had been carrying gold. The two boys take it on themselves to look for it.

Two hackers trying to unbalance the current government, which has become more oppressive and has concentrated money and power in smaller numbers. They have created some code to disrupt Wall Street. This is the underlying theme of the book, money is the main social problem and bringing down the finial system is a way to free it.

The building janitor lives, by choice in an under-high-tide apartment. He seems to be part of the story mainly to explain some features of the technology and find tools.

A reality tv start who lives aloft in a large balloon is trying to save endangered species. A couple of other characters who’s main purpose is to provide ideas and access to equipment.

The story is told as an adventure story. It ultimately brings all the characters together to focus on changing the world. I found the book a little preachy at times. I think Kim Stanley Robinson has better books, but this one is good.

How Did You Paint That?: 100 Ways to Paint Seascapes, Rivers & Lakes

Filed under:Uncategorized — posted by Randolph on February 19, 2021 @ 2:39 am

This book is part of a series that promises to explain the inspiration, interpretation, design and process for creating a painting. Unfortunately it doesn’t really deliver that. Each of these categories is only allotted about two dozen words or less. There isn’t enough to get value from the text.

Each page contains 1 painting taking up about half the page allong with the authors text on the subject and a diagram of the paints/pencils/pastels or whatever he used in the process. Too much is allocated to his tools and far too little on all other aspects of the art.

The book does have some good values. As a picture book, there are 100 nice photos. Each done by a different author in a different style. The art is reproduced well. I think the book would have been better as a picture book with a little information about the painting.

Another nice feature is that most artists have a listed link to a webpage, so it’s easy to find more information about the artist and his other works.



image: detail of installation by Bronwyn Lace