Eats, Shoots & Leaves: The Zero Tolerance Approach to Punctuation by Lynne Truss

Filed under:Uncategorized — posted by Randolph on October 17, 2019 @ 3:31 pm

Eats, Shoots & Leaves by Lynne Truss that is a grammarian with quite a sense of humor. The book is both informative and funny as it discusses various points of grammar and of style.

The book covers different points of grammar, focusing on punctuation and its use. She grabs examples from her surroundings and compares the actual stated with the intended meanings.

Although she uses the British style, she often notes differences between American and British English, then pokes fun at everyone. Any ready will find a thoroughly enjoyable read and will learn a few points of grammar in spite if himself.

The Obelisk Gate by N. K. Jemisin

Filed under:Uncategorized — posted by Randolph on September 11, 2019 @ 7:34 am
The Obelisk Gate on LibraryThing.com

This is the second book in the Broken Earth fantasy trilogy by Jamison. This book continues from where the first one ended seamlessly as if part of the same book.

This book follows Essun, who is [still] looking for her daughter and Nassun, the daughter, who is growing in strength and facing personal doubts. This book also follows the guardian Shaffa, who is undergoing his own transformations. Through his eyes we learn a lot more about the guardians.

Essun and How find themselves in a comm named Castrima with its own unique marvels telling of a former vast technology that is related to the obelisks. Essun is trying to come to terms with saving the world by capturing the moon as indicated by Alibaster at the end of the first book.

Through How, we learn a lot more about the stone eaters. How reveals a lot more of himself as we see him grow (?) or maybe just reveal more of himself.

The story is written well as Jamisin takes the reader through the well-developed world she has created. The series is enjoyable and compelling. I strongly recommend reading it in order.

Impressionist Painting for the Landscape: Secrets for Successful Oil Painting by Cindy Salaski

Filed under:Uncategorized — posted by Randolph on April 11, 2017 @ 12:07 pm

Impressionist Painting for the Landscape: Secrets for Successful Oil Painting by Cindy Salaski

The book got off to a weak start for me. When describing materials, he describes what he has and insists it is the BEST available. He doesn’t give adequate information as to why it is the best and what you can do if his choice isn’t available or is too expensive for the reader. This doesn’t address why the best wouldn’t change over time. Everything he has is the best.

The book got a lot better when he got down to painting techniques and composition. However, the authors didn’t really address impressionism very much. The book includes some step-by-step painting examples, again, there is a discussion of techniques, but not as to why they would support an impressionistic feel.

There are a lot of references at the bottom of alternate pages to a website for additional material. This is just a blatant attempt to get you to a website to view ads. the extra materials consist of two pages, one of very basic suggestions already covered in the book, the second page is a nice painting with a few words about its composition. This could have been included on one page in the book. Instead there are three pages about the two authors and two pages that are selling a video.

The book does have value, don’t expect to come through it with any understanding of impressionism and you can enjoy it.

Moscow Rules (Gabriel Allon) by Daniel Silva

Filed under:Uncategorized — posted by Randolph on January 17, 2016 @ 8:28 am

Moscow Rules (Gabriel Allon) by Daniel Silva

Gabriel is on his honeymoon, when a Russian journalist insists on meeting with him. Gabriel reluctantly accepts the invitation, but when the man is killed before the meeting, Gabriel is drawn into a mystery involving a very powerful weapons dealer with dangerous plans.

Gabriel’s art plays a bigger role than in some of the stories, it has always felt it should be a bigger part of this stories, so this was refreshing.

This is a very well-told story with a lot of intensely interesting characters. The story has a good pace and will keep the reader involved.

Reality Check by David Brin

Filed under:Science Fiction,Uncategorized — posted by Randolph on May 3, 2015 @ 8:32 pm

Reality Check by David Brin

A rather dull, short story. It didn’t have time to develop anything of interest.

The Dark Place by Aaron Elkins

Filed under:Uncategorized — posted by Randolph on February 20, 2015 @ 4:01 pm

The Dark Place by Aaron Elkins

This is the second Gideon Oliver mystery by Aaron Elkins. The dark place is the Olympic National Park in Washington, here the dense canopy hides the sun from most of the forest floor. A few bones in a basket are found by a hiker, and a large footprint is found nearby.

John Lau asks Gideon to provide whatever information he can determine. These are the bones of several people and dead by a number of years, it could be an indian burial site, but there are no Indians in the park. Another sign points to big foot, so the crazies are about.

The story is well-told and a good mystery, throw in a love interest with a park ranger and you have an enjoyable story.

Brightness Reef by David Brin

Filed under:Science Fiction,Series,Uncategorized,Uplift — posted by Randolph on May 3, 2014 @ 7:24 pm

Brightness Reef by David Brin

This book takes place on an abandoned world intended to be natural and develop its own races, who would hopefully be available for uplift. A small population of each of six races, in turn, have landed small colonies on the world. Their intent is to devolve and be re-uplifted, and hopefully to avoid attention and possible punishment from the stellar community. Humans are one of the six.

These races have ancient antipathy for each other. And each brings unique skills and histories. They have overcome their differences, and their are pieces of culture of each that has worked its way into the others, yet they do maintain separate communities.

The story revolves around the arrival of a spaceship or renegade humans. Their intent is unknown, and seems sinister. They aren’t an official envoy, so they shouldn’t be here, either.

This story shows us a different side of each of the races, including the humans. It maintains its suspense on the invaders, and latent tension among the six races.

Unfortunately, this book mostly sets up the series and doesn’t resolve much of anything. The story is interesting, and a must read if you’re interested in the Uplift series.

Foundation’s Fear (Second Foundation Trilogy) by Gregory Benford

Filed under:Science Fiction,Series,Uncategorized — posted by Randolph on March 2, 2014 @ 6:52 pm

Foundation's Fear (Second Foundation Trilogy)
by Gregory Benford

This is the first of a trilogy billing itself as the second foundation trilogy based on Isaac Asimov’s Foundation Trilogy. Although a three-book set, each can stand on its own very well.

The author explores some elements left up in the air by Isaac Asimov, and fills with more current knowledge and philosophy, such as addressing why there are no non-humans in the galaxy.

Some of the topics he addresses include expanding on Dor, who she is and giving her a little background. Her character is expanded, and perhaps changed a bit, at least from what I may have imagined. In general, he adds a lot about computers and robotics that Asimov didn’t go into, or couldn’t because the technology wasn’t available. Philosophically, he approaches the topic of computer intelligence and what could constitute life. In this, Hari creates two simulated people, Voltaire and Jean of Arc, to help him understand society and to help further his psychohistory, Voltaire and Jean of Arc act as a yin and yang, who’s arguments are designed to answer questions. But they evolve their own desires and take on life beyond their programming.

I found the book difficult to work through at times, but still an interesting addition to the Asimov series. I believe those fond of the Asmiov trilogy will enjoy this and find it interesting. It adds background to the trilogy and brings it a little more into the present. Otherwise I don’t think it may not be worth the effort.

Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can’t Stop Talking by Susan Cain

Filed under:Uncategorized — posted by Randolph on May 29, 2012 @ 9:03 pm

Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can't Stop Talking by Susan Cain

My impression of this book seems to improve with age. Susan Cain presents a new perspective in introversion and its place in society. The book seems aimed at parents and teachers, but has enough information of general interest and value to be a good read for anyone interested in these aspects of psychology or sociology.

The book presents the strengths and weaknesses of both introversion and extroversion and why both are of value to society. I found the section on leadership styles and strengths and weaknesses very interesting. Susan continues to touch on why corporate America overvalues the extrovert and the value to business of the introvert and on the relationship between the two personality styles.

More of the book was directed more toward parents and teachers dealing with introverted children than I liked, or I would have rated the book much better. These sections were still interesting, but much less relevant.

This book is a good read for anyone, but it could have been better.

Will Shortz Presents KenKen Easiest Volume 1 by Tetsuya Miyamoto

Filed under:Uncategorized — posted by Randolph on March 23, 2012 @ 12:27 pm

Will Shortz Presents KenKen Easiest Volume 1 by Tetsuya Miyamoto

These puzzles are way too easy. You get used to them pretty quickly.

The puzzles are only based on addition and subtraction, and no larger than 5×5. The last dozen puzzles seemed easier than early ones, i don’t think they were organized well. And they didn’t get challenging enough once you learn the techniques.


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image: detail of installation by Bronwyn Lace